Audi TT Coupe 1999-2006


Review by it
Monday, May 16, 2016

Pros:

  • Stylish look
  • Sophisticated interior
  • Great driving quality

Cons:

  • Expensive repair costs
  • Lack of space

Overview

Audi revealed their first true sports car, the TT, as a concept car at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1995. The concept was a success and in 1999 became a production vehicle and a highlight of the Audi range. The main attractions of the TT are the sporty looking body and interior excellent performance as well as the superb fully turbo-charged engines. The TT provided a breath of fresh air to the market by providing a uniquely styled roadster which instantly became a hit with consumers.

Exterior and Interior

The style of the Audi TT was unique and really provided the market with a sports coupe and roadster that offered something different. The dome shape is easily recognizable, sporty and refined. The driver and front passenger will enjoy the comfortable front seats that are very supportive. However, the rear seats in Audi TT coupe are only comfortable enough only for children and don't offer much room. In the Audi TT Roadster there are no rear passenger seats, but the driver and the passengers get additional room that makes the vehicle more comfortable in the front and includes an optional wind deflector that is built-in behind the seats. Both the coupe and roadster come with the same trim levels which will make the decision between the two versions a lot easier to make. The interior is one of the nicest features of the Audi TT and offers quality and style to match the exterior design.

Performance and Economy

The TT was originally launched as a coupe and came with a 1.8-litre turbocharged engine that came with either 178bhp or 222bhp and was accompanied by a five-speed gearbox. In 2001, this five-speed gearbox was replaced by a six-speeder. Both the models were capable of giving strong performance with the 178bhp gives 60mph in 7.4 seconds and have got a top speed of 140mph. On the other hand, the 223bhp model is capable of giving 0-60 mph in 6.4 seconds. However, the recommended and most commonly found engine's on the second hand market is the 1.8-litre 222bhp engine, which produces noticeable power, is very enjoyable to drive and returns roughly 30mpg. In 2003, Audi introduced the 3.2-litre V6 engine along with the DSG automatic transmission which reduces the time it takes to change gear and so improves the overall acceleration. In 2005, a 1.8-litre T Quattro Sport model capable of producing 237bhp was introduced; it offers excellent performance and is possibly the best model in the range for enthusiastic drivers. The 3.2-litre V6 comes with 4 wheel drive as standard with the 1.8-litre having it as an optional extra. The 4-wheel-drive system does give excellent traction and increases the handling impressively. As it's aimed at being a sports car it comes with fairly firm suspension which helps to sharpen up the handling. With both the stiffened suspension and 4-wheel-drive system it handles very well in all weather conditions.

Like to Drive

Audi TT coupe and roadster are both enjoyable cars to drive even over long distances. The TT handles the open highways better than tough, tight roads. The suspension is a bit stiff but not uncomfortably so. The safety features in the TT include an electronic stabilization program having anti-lock brakes, front and side airbags, the seats have been covered with mounted head, and airbags as standard in the roadster.

Faults and Repairs

There are several problems that have been reported for the TT. For instance, in some vehicles if the CD player is turned 'on' then the rear defogger also needs to be operated at the same time. There have also been problems with engine noise, the suspension, the body paint, and coolant leakages. The repair costs for all of this can be very expensive. It is recommended to go through a full service history check before buying the Audi TT as a used car.


Overall Rating:
Review by DJ Simmo
Monday, May 16, 2016

Overview

"Smooth ride "

Exterior and Interior

Innovative and sporty on the outside, feels like a pilot's cockpit on the inside. A really nice option for an 'affordable' but still 'quality' sports car. I've driven a lot of Mazda's which you would think also match this criteria, but truthfully, they feel like toys in comparison to the TT.

Performance and Economy

Seems to be fair for a sports car. Like any car though, it depends how and where you are driving it. Manual says that you can get 40mpg, but that would only really apply when driving on the motorway - expect somewhere between 20-30 for urban driving. Full tank (as of April 2013) will cost you about £70 to top up.

Like to Drive

Very smooth drive, and has plenty of acceleration - even when up at 100mph, press the accelerator and you still get a healthy kick. Love the gear changing - very easy, and accessible. Steering handles nicely in urban setting and then firms up when you are say, on the motorway. Steering in general may seem SLIGHTLY heavy at first, but you get used to this very quickly. <

Faults and Repairs

Nothing to report yet, however, the paint work does 'scratch easily' particularly with minor knocks. I bought the car when it was at 57K miles - and it runs very nicely. Cam belt was replaced before I received delivery, but probably didn't need it just yet.
Quality
Performance
Comfort
Value