Daewoo Tacuma Estate 2000-2005

Daewoo Tacuma Estate 2000-2005

Review by it
Monday, May 16, 2016

Pros:

  • Cheaper than its rivals Renault and Citroen

Cons:

  • Only two petrol engines available
  • Limited space in the boot

Overview

The Chevrolet Tacuma Mulit Purpose vehicle (MPV), formerly known as the Daewoo Tacuma, performs its job fairly well, but at the same time doesn't really exceed any expectaitions. It is sold as a basic five seater. The ride is not particularly enjoyable with the stiff suspension conveying every bump through to the cars occupants. There is ample space for five people to fit in comfortably, but the boot is too small for five people's luggage. It can however be increased by removing the three back seats. More thought has clearly gone into the layout of the tacuma with the dash being laid out in a logical and easy to use manner.

Exterior and Interior

The Tacuma looks like the love child of the Renault Scenic and the Citroens Picasso just not with the same amount of love and attention going into it. The interior is above par for Daewoo with clearly more thought going into the layout and the materials used also seem more expensive. The interiors are of a much better quality than most Daewoo's but only really match up to their rivals, Renault and Citroen., rather than exceeding the competition. There is adequate space inside for five people to sit comfortably although the boot is not the biggest. The three rear seats can be removed in all but the entry-level model. There is also plenty of storage space offered throughout the cabin with storage drawers beneath the front seats. The rear pillars are very chucky though restricting the drivers' visibility out of the rear windows. The two engines come with their own trim levels with the 1.6 receiving air-con, remote central locking, electric windows and steering wheel audio controls. The 2.0 comes with added extras such as climate control, alloy wheels and seat back tables. There are also top of the range extras which include leather seats and parking sensors.

Performance and Economy

The two engines perform fairly well with the more powerful 119bhp 2.0-litre engine being the overall better machine. It's not exactly the quickest car around but it does have plenty of pull which enables it to cope well with a fully loaded car. The 1.6 with 103bhp isn't far behind but it lacks that little extra power and, as such, it struggles when the car is fully loaded. The 1.6 manages better fuel efficiency reaching 35.3mpg compared to the 2.0-litres 32.8mpg. The manual gearbox performs well however the 4 speed automatic isn't as good as it reduces the performance and makes the car feel slow. The Tacuma is cheaper to insure than most of its rivals with the 1.6-litre falling into group 8 and the 2.0-litre into group 10.

Like to Drive

The Tacuma isn't the most exciting car to drive, but you don't generally buy a Daewoo for its thrilling performance. The ride is too stiff, which helps to prevent body roll in the corners, but conveys almost every bump in the road through to the cars occupants. Wind and road noise isn't overly loud and the engines are both very quiet which is a blessing. The thick pillars can be a nuisance when trying to reverse into and out of spaces as they restrict the visibility out of the rear end of the car.

Faults and Repairs

There are no major problems with the Tacuma, however, there was a recall of 6000 car in 2002 to prevent possible cracks appearing in the brake pipes and hydraulic fluid pipelines. These were all repaired free of charge so all of them should have been replaced, but it would be good to check the service history just to make sure. There have also been reports of the dash rattling by Tacuma owners. The good news is that the servicing and repairs are fairly cheap compared to rivals.